Cláusulas adjetivas y sus tipos: cláusulas adjetivas esenciales y no esenciales

Cláusulas adjetivas y sus tipos: cláusulas adjetivas esenciales y no esenciales

En esta publicación, aprendemos qué es una cláusula adjetiva y cómo usarla en inglés. Al final se adjunta una videolección sobre las cláusulas adjetivas; puede desplazarse directamente hacia abajo si prefiere videos a artículos.

What is an adjective clause?

Una cláusula adjetiva es un tipo de cláusula dependiente que funciona como adjetivo. Viene justo después del sustantivo o del pronombre al que modifica. Una cláusula adjetiva comienza con las siguientes conjunciones subordinantes (pronombres relativos):

  • Who
  • Whom
  • Whose
  • That
  • Which
  • Why
  • Where
  • When.

Examples:

  • The guy who lives next to my house is a professional fighter.
    “Who lives next to my house” is the adjective clause that’s coming next to the noun ‘guy’ and modifying it.
  • I love the book that my father gifted me on my last birthday.
    “That my father gifted me on my last birthday” is the adjective clause that’s sitting next to the noun book and modifying it.
  • We haven’t been to Dubai, which is one of my dream places to visit.
    “Which is one of my dream places to visit” is the adjective clause that’s sitting next to the noun ‘Dubai’ and giving information about it. But here, it is giving non-essential information about the noun it’s modifying and that is why it is offset using a comma. ‘Dubai’ is a proper name and doesn’t need any modification to be identified.

Types of adjectives clauses in English

Hay dos tipos de cláusulas adjetivas según la información que dan:

  • Essential adjective clauses
  • Nonessential adjective clauses

Essential adjective clause

Las cláusulas adjetivas esenciales son cláusulas dependientes que modifican un sustantivo o un pronombre con información esencial o definitoria. El sustantivo o el pronombre que identifican no son propios ni específicos. Una cláusula adjetiva esencial es importante para el significado de la oración, ya que brinda información esencial sobre el sustantivo o pronombre que modifica.

Examples:

  • I don’t know anyone who can teach you boxing.
  • People who can control their minds live a highly successful life.
  • We are looking for a place where we party peacefully.
  • I know the reason why she broke up with you.
  • That was the year when we got married.
  • The box that you sent me yesterday was empty.
  • I still have the letter that she had written for me on Valentine’s day.

Intente leer estas oraciones sin las cláusulas adjetivas; las oraciones tendrán un significado completamente diferente sin ellos. Es por eso que las llamamos cláusulas adjetivas esenciales, ya que son esenciales para dar el significado correcto.

NOTA: Las cláusulas adjetivas esenciales también se denominan cláusulas adjetivas definitorias.

Nonessential adjective clause

Las cláusulas adjetivas no esenciales son cláusulas dependientes que modifican un sustantivo o un pronombre con información no esencial o no definitoria. El sustantivo o el pronombre que identifican son propios (ya identificados), y por eso se compensan con comas.

Las cláusulas adjetivas no esenciales también se denominan cláusulas adjetivas no definitorias.

Examples:

  • Last month, we went on a trip to Auli, which is a beautiful place.
  • Jon Jones, who is the light heavyweight champion in the UFC, got arrested last night.
  • She doesn’t even know Max, whose bag she has stolen.
  • Russell Peter, who is a famous comedian, is coming back to India after 15 years.
  • After all the travelling and shopping, we dropped the plan to go to the Red Fort, which is a famous monument.
  • Mangoes, which I love eating, are used in many dishes.

(Tenga en cuenta que aunque ‘mangos’ es un sustantivo común, estamos usando comas antes y después de la cláusula del adjetivo, ya que solo pasa un comentario sobre ellos, no los identifica ni nos dice de qué mangos está hablando el hablante).

Tenga en cuenta que estas cláusulas adjetivas no son esenciales para el significado central de una oración; solo brindan información adicional, lo que hace que una oración sea más atractiva y significativa, pero no brindan información esencial sobre los sustantivos/pronombres que están modificando, ya que ya están identificados/especificados.

How to form an adjective clause in English

Hay 3 componentes que necesitas para formar una cláusula adjetiva en inglés:

  1. Relative pronoun
  2. The subject of the clause (noun or pronoun)
  3. The verb of the subject

Estas son las 3 cosas que necesitas, al menos, para formar una cláusula adjetiva en inglés. También tenga en cuenta que una cláusula de adjetivo se encuentra justo al lado de un sustantivo o un pronombre, generalmente un sustantivo, y lo modifica con alguna información.

The cake that she had baked is still there in the fridge.

El pronombre relativo (conjunción) a veces funciona como sujeto de una cláusula adjetiva. Mira atentamente estos ejemplos:

  • The boy who was playing here yesterday has gone missing.
  • We haven’t seen a man that can walk on water.

Adjective clauses and commas

¿Las cláusulas adjetivas deben compensarse con comas o no? Eso depende del trabajo que haga la cláusula adjetiva en una oración: si brinda información esencial (importante) para identificar el sustantivo/pronombre que modifica, no use comas para compensarlo. Pero si brinda información adicional (no esencial) o simplemente pasa un comentario sobre el sustantivo o pronombre que modifica, sin ayudar a los lectores a identificar el sustantivo/pronombre que modifica, use comas para compensarlo.

  • I know a man who can teach you English. (Specifying which man the speaker is referring to)
  • Virat Kohli, who is one of the best Indian cricketers, has opened an academy that will help school students to learn cricket.

Esta oración tiene dos cláusulas adjetivas: la primera “que es uno de los mejores jugadores de críquet indios” brinda información adicional o no esencial sobre el nombre propio ‘Virat Kohli’, pero la segunda cláusula adjetiva “eso ayudará a los estudiantes a aprender cricket” está modificando el sustantivo ‘academia’ con información esencial; nos está ayudando a comprender qué tipo de academia va a ser.

NOTA: “Quién” se puede usar para brindar información esencial y no esencial, y “cuál” no se puede usar para brindar información esencial.

We can omit the relative pronoun in some cases.

Si un pronombre relativo tiene el sujeto de la cláusula adjetiva, se puede sacar de la cláusula adjetiva sin cambiar su significado.

  • She is the girl who I love.
  • She is the girl I love.
  • The match that we watched at his house was epic.
  • The match we watched at his house was epic.

Pero si el propio pronombre relativo funciona como sujeto de la cláusula adjetiva, no lo omita.

  • He is the person who can get you out of this situation.
  • He is the person can get you out of this situation. ❌

NOTA: los adverbios relativos (cuándo, dónde, por qué) no se omiten aunque tengan sus sujetos.

  • We can’t remember the year when we got married.
  • We can’t remember the year we got married. ❌
  • I know a place where we can hide the money.
  • I know a place we can hide the money. ❌
  • That’s the reason why nobody confides anything in you.
  • That’s the reason nobody confides anything in you. ❌

WHO vs THAT

‘Eso’ se puede usar en lugar de ‘quién’ en una cláusula adjetiva, ya que se puede usar para referirse tanto a una persona como a una cosa.

  • The man who is standing next to Simran is a magician.
  • The man that is standing next to Simran is a magician.

NOTA: cuando ‘eso’ se refiere a una cosa, ‘quién’ no puede usarse en lugar de eso. Solo es posible cuando ‘eso’ se refiere a una persona.

  • Do you still have the mobile that your father gifted you in 2015?
  • Do you still have the mobile who your father gifted you in 2015? ❌
  • Talk to the girl that is wearing the red top.
  • Talk to the girl who is wearing the red top.

More examples of adjectives clauses

More examples of adjectives clauses
Adjective Clauses In Action. Adjective clauses do not change the basic meaning of the sentence. In some cases, when they provide more information into a sentence, they need to be set off with commas. Pizza,which most people love, is not very healthy. The people whose names are on the list will go to camp. Grandpa remembers the old days when there was no television. Fruit that is grown organical lyis expensive. Students who are intelligent get good grades. Eco-friendly cars that run on electricity save gas.
  • Do you have anything that I can read on the plane?
  • The man whose daughter you have kidnapped is a gangster.
  • Rajiv Chowk, which is one of the most famous metro stations in Delhi, is the place where I used to meet her.
  • Do you still remember the time when we would bunk classes to play games?
  • Most people don’t know the reason why they do what they do.
  • The adjective clauses are colored red, and the nouns or pronouns they are modifying are in bold.

Key points

1. Both the relative pronouns WHO & THAT can be used in an essential adjective clause or a non-essential adjective clause.

  • Arijit Singh, who is a brilliant singer, is from my hometown.
  • Titanic, which is my favorite movie, was shot in a swimming pool.
  • The boy who was selling notebooks at the stand was homeless.
  • The book that is on the table is amazing.

2. The relative pronoun ‘THAT‘ can refer to both a person and a thing.

  • I lost the card that she had given me. (referring to a thing)
  • I know the girl that you are dating these days. (referring to a person)

3. An adjective clause is a dependent clause. It can’t stand on its own.
Las cláusulas adjetivas son un tipo de cláusula dependiente. No da un significado completo por sí solo. Debe agregarse a una cláusula independiente para dar un significado completo.

  • Who loves you. (incomplete sentence, adjective clause)
  • I know someone who loves you. (complete sentence)

Artículos Relacionados

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.